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  Nick Ervinck
   
 
Ikrausim
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Ikrausim

 
Nick Ervinck (1981) lives and works in Lichtervelde (Belgium) He explores the borders between various media. He tries to find an interaction between virtual constructions and hand-made sculptures. A lot of different media are used by the artist such as: prints, video and digital drawings. They lead to the making of sculptural forms made of painted plaster, polyester and wood. In his digital prints and animations Nick Ervinck creates a surrealistic space by strange combinations of forms and by playing widely with volumes, proportions and colours. At least, one can say the virtual world of this artist is strange. Polymorphic, synthetic forms invade 'seemingly' authentic rooms, monumental buildings are detached from the ground and become living sculptures or daring combinations of ships, churches and skyscrapers float over an endless sea. This world is a fiction, constructed and deconstructed by an almighty creator. Tired of playing games by others, Nick Ervinck created his own world.

Ikrausim (2009) Rolf Alfred Stein, a well-known 20th century Sinologist, discovered that early Chinese people believed that somewhere in the highest mountains there was a cave containing an exact representation of the world outside. This motif frequently shows up in Chinese art, where the artist tries to suggest an infinite, continuous world within a finite, limited object or space. A good illustration can be found in Chinese gardens. Their spatial organization makes it impossible for the viewer to get an over-all, panoramic view. One is only able to see the different parts. The garden rocks, consisting of numerous holes within holes, create the same mazelike, ephemeral impression. During a walk through the Yuyuan garden in Shanghai, a marvellous garden constructed by a government officer for his parents along the border of the Huangpu river, Nick got fascinated by these perforated, irregular rocks. Their forms reminded him of the sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986) and his own early sculptures. Inspired by the oriental and occidental tradition, as well as the aesthetics of so-called blob architecture, he constructed a contemporary, digitalized rock sculpture. The newest 3D animation and 3D printing techniques even allow these complex structures to enter into reality itself. It is exactly this mutual fertilization between the digital and the actual that Nick Ervinck is interested in. SOUND Jonathan D'Hondt

Gallery
Koraalberg www.koraalberg.com


www.nickervinck.com
 
 
 
   
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